Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

27. July 2012 08:02
by Jobo
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The Haapsalu Scarf: Square and Triangular Lace Scarves from Estonia

27. July 2012 08:02 by Jobo | 0 Comments

Holy Crap Batman.. the next instalment in the Haapsalu Shawl book series is out. and is it ever fantastic!

 

- As if the first book wasn't full of wonderful as it was. the second one is full of treasures and jaw-dropping incredible lace motifs.

 

- The previous publication was released in both English and Estonian, but this one is bilingual, with the pages divided up between the languages. Even so, it's still very readable and the print is nice and large. Some of the charts are tinier, but honestly, if you're crazy enough to try knitting these with thread and tiny needles, I doubt a small print chart is going to scare you off. just sayin' !

 

- More than just a lace dictionary. while full of charts and descriptions of different lace motifs and styles, this book also contains FULL patterns for many different scarves (FYI, in the Estonian tradition square and triangle lace is defined as a "Scarf", and a long rectangular stole is a "Shawl") and several formats for putting them together too. from the basic sewn on edging traditional format, to the more contemporary knit on borders and corner-miters.

 

- I've only flipped through the book a half dozen times so far. and not actually knit anything out of it yet, but I can tell you this:  The photography is fantastic, the historical details are fascinating, and the lace itself is breathtaking.  The first book was very well done, and I was able to knit actual projects from the basic schematics and charts alone, so I can only imagine how much easier it will be to get started on these where there are full patterns with stitch counts, layouts, etc.

 

- if you're thinking about buying this book:  Stop thinking about it and just do it.  Worth. Every. Penny.  I'm completely in love!

26. March 2012 12:59
by Jobo
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Silk and Satin ? Calculations...

26. March 2012 12:59 by Jobo | 0 Comments

Ever since learning about the fine wonderful lace of Estonia, Orenburg, and Shetland... I have been dreaming of spinning a truly cobwebby and fine yarn to knit something as authentic as possible.  These yarns are so fine, froghair fine, intimidatingly fine...

Silk and Satin Angora compare with knitpicks lace

My latest yarn is actually not that far off of being fine enough to try ? ack!

To give you an idea... here is my 2 ply yarn compared with a skein of Knit Picks Lace yarn ?>

Their skein is 440 yards per 50 grams. (that?s approximately 4000 yards per pound)

Mine was 185 yards in 9 grams.  No that isn?t a typo.  9 grams. (That?s about 9300 yards per pound!)

I bet if my yarn was 100 % wool instead of having a silk component, the yards per pound ratio would have been lighter still...

To give you an idea... true gossamer threads used in Orenburg lace knitting are somewhere around 10000 ? 15000 yards per pound.  Cobweb is considered to be anything finer than 6000 yards per pound, or 40 wraps per inch.  My thread was around 50 wraps per inch.

:)  Maybe I can accomplish something like the old master lace knitters some day?  I guess I?ll keep on practicing!  Knitting with thread you can hardly see is quite a challenge also.  I find going back to sock yarn after knitting with this feels like knitting with rope...

Silk and Satin Angora Skein LoopsA nice balanced 2 ply... super shiny... and with just a little halo!  As it is knitting up... the halo is gently rising to a nice soft fuzz...

Silk and Satin Angora Skein Glamour ShotFull Skein Glamour Shot:  9 grams = 185 yards.  Yes, it fits in the palm of your hand, literally!

2. December 2011 15:07
by Jobo
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Haapsalu Shawl? or at the very least, an attempt at one

2. December 2011 15:07 by Jobo | 0 Comments

I have been in love with Estonian Lace from the second I laid eyes on it.  It doesn?t matter which pattern? a leaf, vine, geometric, lily of the valley, paw prints? I love them all.  It?s been in the back of my mind for years now that I neeeeeed to spin the finest yarn I can and go ahead and just knit one of these.  As close to the authentic ones as possible.  I know it will never be 100% right, as I can?t get the right materials here, and I?ll likely not be visiting Estonia anytime soon? but a girl can dream, Right?

At the last Maritime Handspinners? Retreat in October 2011, I bought an 8 ounce bag of Romney washed locks.  I wanted to try spinning for lace directly from the lock (as do some of the other lace spinning geniuses? ahem Margaret Stove cough) and see how well I could do with it.  This wool isn?t the softest one I?ve ever worked with, but the locks are overall quite clean, fairly free of VM, and have a nice bouncy texture.  I?ve been just flicking them open to untangle the tips, and going at it with a Bosworth Mini. 

So far, I think I?ve spun maybe 200 yards of it (very fine 2 ply) and just decided to cast on and give it a try in pattern to see if it ?works? or not.  I didn?t wash to set the yarn either.  I figure blocking will even that part out for me.  I?m not sure how much of the wool I?ve used so far, but there does seem to be a fair bit of loss.  I?m honestly just hoping that I?ll get enough for the shawl out of 4 ish ounces (since I?m estimating I?m losing 30 ? 40 % of the wool? that should be possible out of the 8 ounces).  My plan (if you can actually call it one) is to knit up this small sample ball and then measure and weigh it and extrapolate from there whether I?ll have enough to carry out the rest of the shawl.  I figure if I do run out? I can just make a borderless plain center panel.  That would still be quite striking, even without a border.

I?m using my Woody Knitters Straights size 3 mm, and I?m following the Haapsalu Shawl Book for the number of stitches, cast on recommendations, motifs, and general encouragement.  I chose to use the ?Double Lily of the Valley? chart as my main center design, with a 4 stitch garter border all around.  Then I?ll knit a border lace separately and sew it on to the central rectangle.  This aspect scares me a little, but I tried a sample tiny shawl last year, and my sewn on border looked ok in the end.

double lily of the valley haapsalu 2

As you can see? The little ball is going quite far.  I think I have enough to do the chart completely and probably another half dozen rows.  The shawl is going to be 141 stitches across (you?re only seeing a small portion here, since my needles aren?t that long) and features 3.5 repeats of the Double Lily of the Valley chart across.  To give you an idea of scale? remember that the needles are 3 mm, and I?ve posed a piece of the lace with a Canadian Dime (which is 18 mm diameter) for scale.  I found knitting with the ?thread? was a little bit tedious in the beginning, but I?m getting used to it now.  I had planned to try and work 2 ? 3 rows every day on it, but sadly I?ve gotten behind with all of the other holiday hub-bub.  I hope to get back at it in the new year, and also back into spinning more of this up.  The spinning itself has been quite enjoyable as well!  I?ll post more when progress has actually been made :)

double lily of the valley haapsalu

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