Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

29. December 2009 22:32
by Jobo
2 Comments

The Naughty Reindeer Strikes again

29. December 2009 22:32 by Jobo | 2 Comments

Rudolph?  forget reindeer games, he's been naughty this year? really really naughty?  definetly not PG-13 Rating either!

Some time ago, I spotted the "fornicating reindeer" chart on Ravelry, and I knew it would be perfect to make a not-so-normal gift for my Brother-in-law Ian. 

To give you some background? a few years ago for Christmas I knit him a pair of custom Norwegian Moose Mittens.  They were beautiful, oversized for man sized hands, with traditional patterns, and a nice Big Moose on the backs of the hands.  The youngest brother, who was around 11 at the time helped me to pick out the yarn? so the color was, errrr, a little less appropriate than one would have chosen for a 6 foot something Man - Fuschia Pink and Black.  There were lots of giggles on Christmas Morning when he opened them in front of the family.

Despite the Color Mismatch, he actually wore them!  I didn't know it at the time, but his buddies over in Deer Lake, Newfoundland, actually call him "Moose" as a nickname.  Apparently he got teased a bit? but if you knew Ian, you'd know? you don't really argue with a guy who is his size :)

So this year, I thought I would make him another knitted Moose item? though perhaps in a more color appropriate for a Gentleman of his stature ;)  The pattern however is MUCH less appropriate.  This little chart has been turned into everything from Mittens, to Hats and Scarves? each one more charming than the last.  I decided on the hat just because I knew I could finish that in a reasonable amount of time, and it could be finished with just one ball of each color.  Last time with the mittens I almost ran out of yarn? dude has XL hands

Enter:  Fornicating Deer Chart

I'm no ungulate expert? but to me, it seems that the chart could be reindeer or moose, so I think it works out okay?

Here's Ian sporting his new Chapeau:

 Humping Hat

I was impressed at how well received the whole thing was... there were lots of laughs and giggles, especially from my Father-in-law who laughed until he had tears rolling down both cheeks!  Apparently the design doesn't catch your eye right away, so isn't that noticeably naughty, but once you figure it out, it's quite funny.  I'm waiting to hear the Deer Lake Newfoundland reviews.  You never know I might be commissionned to make a few more?

Hope you all had a Merry ChristMOOSE!

18. December 2009 15:09
by Jobo
1 Comments

Divine Chapeau

18. December 2009 15:09 by Jobo | 1 Comments

The hunt for fast, efficient, well-received Christmas projects is on!  I tried my best this year to work on homemade gifts for my family members and friends, but seriously folks ? there is only a week left before Christmas! (If you weren?t aware, I?m so sorry to break the news)

After some time spent procrastinating, then panicking, then searching for patterns, I found this:

Divine Hat by Rheatheylia

hatforweb

Originally, I thought I might *knit* some hats or scarves or something for a couple of hard to buy for people on my list.  I generally feel bad about gifting people boring things like gift certificates and chocolates, though I?m not exactly sure why, because I myself love receiving these!  So in efforts to better round out a less-personal gift, I try and throw in something homemade.  Last year, my go-to homemade item was basic fingerless mitts (a-la-Irish-Hiking-Mitts) and they seemed to be reasonably well received? (at least to my face)

I knew that I could probably knit the projects, but where time is running short, I deduced that *crochet* might end up being a more efficient use of my time in this case.  I generally prefer to crochet large projects, like blankets, as opposed to knitting them just because it is so much faster!  For some reason I tend to forget that you can crochet smaller more detailled items too? who knows why.

So I set out on Rav to try and find some ideas for Crocheted Hats? and this is what I came up with.  (Not only me, according to Ravelry records, more than 900 of these have been recorded to date)  The designer, Rheatheylia, must be so proud that this pattern has become such a mainstay ? and I can say, the attention is 100% deserved, this is a really well written pattern, and a fun design to work on!

I really like the little ?shell? pattern that emerges from this straightforward recipe ? made almost entirely of Double-Crochets.  The whole thing works up FAST.  I don?t mean ?get-it-done-in-a-few-days? fast? I mean ?make-the-whole-hat-in-three-hours? Fast!  In particular, Rheatheylia?s row join technique is INGENIUS? you really can?t tell where the rows join in the finished hat! (a relief to me since seamless row joins are something which I have not completely mastered)  The only modification I made was to go down a hook size since I generally crochet pretty loose ? I used 6.0 mm for the main body of the hat and a 5.0mm hook for the ribbing.

For this particular hat, I used a wayward skein of Paton?s Canadiana Wool and used up around 3/4 of the skein (yay for sales at Michael?s last month ? it cost me less than 4$ to make this hat)  Just for kicks, I thought I would start a second hat and see how far I would get with the rest of the ball, and I got to Row 10.  From the estimate, it looks like I will be able to get 3 hats from 2 balls of wool, which is very convenient since I have another ball just sitting at home waiting for me? lol.  I also have a skein of Cream Yarn of the same brand which may find itself also becoming a Divine Hat.

Now I just have to go home and crochet like a crazy person? I think I could reasonably churn out 2-3 more of these for gifts if I really got at it.  Imagine, if the first one only took 3 hours? Now that I don?t have to look at the pattern, things are only going to get faster and faster!

4. December 2009 08:00
by Jobo
0 Comments

Jobo's Favorite Things: Christmas 2009 DAY 4

4. December 2009 08:00 by Jobo | 0 Comments

Phew!  the first 3 days of this series have just flown by!  Thanks for stopping by to read each day!

Today’s Favorite thing:  BOOOOKKKKSSSS!

Ever since childhood, I have always loved books of all kinds.  Lately it seems that my stash of “how to” and pattern books has grown a lot faster than my fiction collection, but hey… it’s not terribly surprising I hope.  I have dozens of books about quilting techniques, and patterns ranging from stitch-by-hand-appliqué to stack-and-whack.  My knitting and spinning collection makes my quilting books look like a *small* pile…  I am afraid the quilt books are sadly outnumbered up in the studio!

Today’s post is about books I am already lucky enough to own… and the next Book Feature will discuss some books that I am hoping will show up in my stocking ;) ahem*hint*hint

selbuvotterThe Ultimate Norwegian Mitten Book - 

Selbuvotter:  Biography of a Knitting Tradition by Terri Shea

Some time ago, when I was new to searching the internet for knitting resources, I came across a review of this book quite by accident.  I had never been exposed to fair isle knitting or the breathtaking art of knitting 2-colored patterned mittens.  I was completely dumbstruck.  I remember just staring at the patterns featured in the article and thinking “holy crap… I simply must learn how to make these!!!”  At that point in time, I did not have a lot of experience purchasing things online, but decided to go for it anyways and boy am I ever pleased that I did. 

Terri Shea’s book is full of folklore and history – and some amazing mitten patterns.  The charts are easy to read and the mitten patterns are quite complete and straightforward to follow.  There are errata available where errors exist, but these are uncommon.  The one challenge I found to making these mittens was finding suitable yarn, as the majority of the yarns listed in the book are not sold by any yarn stores in my area. 

If you think you will ever want to learn to make Norwegian mittens, this book is an ultimate anthology of patterns and a very helpful resource.  Everyone I have shown this book to has wanted a copy… and for good reason – it’s the best book I’ve been able to find on the subject.

knittingsockswithhandpaintedyarn Great Sock Knitting collection -

Knitting Socks with Handpainted Yarn by Carol Sulcoski

I am a self admitted Sock-a-holic… and I have a serious willpower problem when it comes to purchasing skeins of temptingly beautiful hand painted Indie yarns.  The truth of the matter is – I love to knit socks, and the more patterns I can find that make my fingers itch to cast on something new the better.

I knew this book was going to be a winner before it was even released.  One of the designers featured in the book, Deb Barnhill, worked at the Dalhousie College of Pharmacy where I spent 4 years of my life.  I have been lucky enough to keep in touch with Deb over the years… and when I heard that one of her patterns was to be featured in a sock book, I ordered it before hearing another word.  This book does not disappoint.

The beginning section of the book teaches readers about the many types of hand painted yarns available today, and helps outline the nuts and bolts of the way that each yarn behaves in different types of patterns.  I liked the simple and no-nonsense descriptions and advice given – i.e. how to avoid/encourage pooling and flashing, and of course choosing patterns that will most complement the delectable yarns that you already have in your stash too!  Also included are handy tutorials for several kinds of cast-ons, bind-offs and Kitchener Stitch.

Then comes the patterns section… I have flipped through this book countless times, drooling over admiring the eye-catching photography and day dreaming of the process involved in each pair of socks.  This books features many different sock construction types, and lots of unique and different strategies to avoid pooling.  With 21 different patterns by 17 different Sock-RockStars (i.e. Chrissy Gardiner and Ann Budd) – there is something for every sock knitter in this book… in fact I have personal plans to make at least a half-dozen of them, maybe more.  Every time I look through it, I find something else that I want to try.  Make sure you have a couple skeins of hand painted yarn and some needles close at hand when you bring this little gem home… you might not be able to resist the urge to cast on!

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