Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

23. October 2014 07:45
by Jobo
1 Comments

TBT: Inspiring Oneself...

23. October 2014 07:45 by Jobo | 1 Comments

While trying to get myself excited about starting to blog again, and creating a new Facebook page, to try and reach a different audience... I started looking at some old project photos to try and get my mojo running.

Let's just say, I didn't get a large volume of projects completed in the last few years, but I love love love many of the things I did manage to make :)  Just seeing them makes me daydream about the fun I had through the process, and makes me wonder what else I can come up with.

I've been sketching in my design book again, and going downstairs to the studio and just staring at the piles of yarn.  It's a little depressing that I don't really have much time or energy to throw into this kind of stuff lately, but I know I can get back there eventually... someday.  The days when I sleep more than a few hours, I'm actually feeling almost human.  This morning, on the other hand - is a two-coffee-minimum type of morning!

Without further ado:  Here are some of the photos that caught my eye! (Click the Photos for links to some original articles)

Magic Mirror Mittens

 

Vernal Equinox in Handspun Merino Silk

 

Lilac Leaves Estonian Stole

 

3. August 2012 09:11
by Jobo
0 Comments

Lilac Leaves. first crack at a traditionally constructed Haapsalu Shawl

3. August 2012 09:11 by Jobo | 0 Comments

I've been admiring these things for soooo long now, it's a little hard to believe its the first time I've managed to actually do one!  I've done some samplers, and several Estonian-style lace shawls. but this time I used the schematics from "The Haapsalu Shawl" book and decided to try the traditional way with a simple border and center motif.

 

lilac leaves with border

 

The basic idea is this:  Knit a rectangle with a garter stitch border.  Knit a border separately and seam it onto the rectangle in a manner that it stretches and melds in with the center.  After blocking, you can't tell it's sewn on at all.  In fact, I like the way it looks like the corners have been rounded a bit.

 

I decided to go with a very simple pairing for the first try. some lilac leaves for the central panel, and a basic garter lace edge.  I love the simplicity of this style of lace leaf.  It's a repeating pattern of 16 rows.   The reverse rows are all purl, the yarnovers stack in a perfectly tidy "spine" for the leaves, and the decreases form a simple point to the leaves.  I didn't have to think too hard, but still managed to create something quite elegant.

 

lilac leaves sewn on border

 

For a first time really sewing on a border, I think it turned out pretty well.  One mistake I made though. cutting the thread between the two long border sections.  All that meant was that I had 4 more stupid ends to weave in.  Also - I think I would be a little better at weaving in the ends next time.  The silk in the thread made things a little more slippery than I am used to, and meant a little more weaving and fiddling than plain wool would have been.

 

I was interested to learn that the edging is knit in garter lace (all wrong side rows are "knitted" instead of "purled") so that the points don't roll after blocking and unpinning.  The central panels of often very complicated lace are almost all stockinette lace (purling the wrong side rows) but the edgings are planned in a really smart way.  Somebody was thinking when they decided on that one. it's true - after blocking, even after folding and refolding, and toting it around for a week or two, no rolling.

 

More about the yarn. in case you were wondering:  It's KnitPicks Gloss lace in "Bare".  I really like the simplicity of this yarn.  70% Merino wool with 30% silk.  Nice and light (50g is about 440 yards) and the silk adds just that hint of shine.  I used about 75 g in total. basically using up the leftovers from some other project I had been puttering with.  I think next time I'd like to go for the full sized shawl though.  This one was around 18 inches wide by 50 inches long. the real deal Haapsalu should be more like 30 inches wide by 75 inches long.  I was running out of yarn, so maybe it's best I just stuck with the conservative approach.  I suppose not all things (quilts, shawls, blankets, etc) must be ginormously huge.  Try telling my brain that though.  "Go big or go home" is it's motto some days.

 

lilac leaves thru a ring

 

Seeing as how this shawl is using a little larger yarn than called for (a true Haapsalu uses finer 100% wool thread) and the dimensions aren't quite large enough. maybe it's not surprising that the shawl will slip through my wedding ring?  And No, I don't have super large hands or anything.  I'll be interested to see if the next one will go through it. I'm working on a Lily of the Valley one next, and it has lots of Nupps (Estonian bobble stitches of a fashion) which may add some bulk to the design.  Only time will tell  : )

29. March 2012 08:57
by Jobo
0 Comments

Banyan Tree... completed!

29. March 2012 08:57 by Jobo | 0 Comments

Now I just wish I was lying in a hammock in a lovely warm tropical breeze under an actual Banyan Tree... instead of being zonked with a lovely sniffly sneezy cold :(

Either way though, the socks are lovely!

Banyan Tree Finished 2

I really enjoyed everything about this pair... from the twisted rib, to the leaves (which always seem to fly off the needles for me), to the little cables (I don?t know why I never thought of making 3 stitch cables and just moving the outside stitch? duh!) and the streamlined and simple foot.  I also enjoyed the heel flap, which isn?t rocket science, but looks so different compared to the standard slip stitch heel

Banyan Tree Finished 

All in all ? a great knit... and a free pattern!  Go check it out over at the loopy ewe :) they have fantastic yarns too by the way, and excellent customer service!

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