Jobo Designs

Letting the crafty creative juices flow. Knitting, spinning, crafting, dyeing, rabbits, sheep and more!

11. June 2010 11:29
by Jobo
1 Comments

Double Take... Diagonal Lace Socks!

11. June 2010 11:29 by Jobo | 1 Comments

Yes... I realize I just completed a pair of Diagonal Lace Socks... I just enjoyed them so much that when I couldn't come up with an idea for this yarn (Fundy Footsee by Done Roving) I decided that I should just pick something and start!  So since this pattern was fresh in my mind already... out these came!

diagonal lace socks 3 I had tried a couple of patterns out with this yarn, but it seemed like the "stripes" kept being too prominent and showing up like a blue lightning streak across whatever pattern I chose. 

My solution to this problem?  Stop worrying about it and just knit.  I decided that since the striping was just not going away, and I didn't feel like knitting plain stockinette at the time, I just needed to bite the bullet and persevere regardless of annoying blue stripes!

I always enjoy seeing the pooling/flashing socks that other people make!  It never bothers me that their socks get blotches of color here and there, or if the yarn shows up in obvious bands.  For some reason I am just more critical of my own knitting than of other peoples...  who knew I was a control freak?  sheesh... this probably wasn't the first clue either!

I actually really like the end result of these socks, though I was starting to second guess myself when I got up to the first heel and saw that there was going to be a big blue blotch on one side of the gusset and a big fuschia blotch on the other side... I decided to just go with it.  Surprisingly the second sock made the exact same blotch pattern.  I must have been knitting both socks with the exact same gauge/tension?

I'll have to remember this experiment in self restraint (let the colors be... let the colors be...) next time I have a skein of unruly pooling sock yarn.  The colors are complimentary, they look good together... they will pool and flash and stripe as they want and all will be right and good in the universe!

 

diagonal lace socks 4 diagonal lace socks 2 diagonal lace socks1

Diagonal Lace socks by Wendy Johnston... knit in Fundy Footsee by Done Roving... purchased last summer in Maine

25. May 2010 05:00
by Jobo
3 Comments

Shetland Triangle... Finished and Blocked

25. May 2010 05:00 by Jobo | 3 Comments

floating on the breeze

shetland triangleThe Shetland Triangle has been a quite enjoyable project... beads included.  The tiny crochet hook was very easy to use, and even the beaded rows flew along at reasonable speeds.  I decided that the shawl didn't need all-over bling, but perhaps just the last few pattern repeats.  After some deliberation, I choose to add them to row 9 (the mostly plain knit row of the 10 row repeat) and then to bead the very points of the border with 3 beads on each point, and the centre one of course.

The beads themselves seem to match in quite nicely.  At first I wasn't sure if the slightly rainbow essence would match the Plum yarn, but I think that they compliment the shawl more than a plain flat black bead would have.  I actually found these beads by accident while shopping at Michael's - they were part of a premade necklace with multiple strands of beads.  There were strands of plain black shiny seed beads, several of these "e" beads that I used for Shetland Triangle, some silver metallic looking "e" beads, and finally some black "e" beads that have the look of hematite.  I bought the whole necklace for 99 cents... and I only used one strand for this piece!  I'm sure I will find something else to do with the rest at some point.

shetland triangle2

In the end I worked 2 more repeats of the initial lace pattern than the instructions called for, and surprisingly enough, I managed to use only one skein of the KnitPicks Shadow Lace that I had.  I wanted this to be large enough to wrap comfortably around the shoulders, but I don't really know the recipient that well, so I wasn't sure she would want a really huge overpowering shawl.  I think I reached a decent happy medium on size.  This also means I have enough yarn to make another of these... maybe for me, since I am feeling undecided about giving this away.  I think that's usually how I know I did a good job... if I like the item well enough to keep it myself, it's likely nice enough to be giving it away to someone else?

 

shetland triangle4

When I was knitting this up... using the prescribed sized needles... I had wondered if maybe I should have used larger needles to get a more airy feel to this shawl.  As usual though, the magic of blocking evened out balance, and I think it feels just about right. 

The finished shawl is light but still has enough substance to warm up the wearer.  I am always amazed at how much warmth a light shawl can give.  I think it's kind of like afghans.  How can something so full of "holes" trap so much heat next to the body?  Must be one of those life mysteries ;)  I hope that the person I made this for will feel good when she wears it.  I tried to think kind and comforting thoughts as I knit along, so I like to think that maybe those good vibes will go along with her wherever she goes.  Positive Energy is Good Medicine in itself.

7. April 2010 16:00
by Jobo
7 Comments

Handspun Socks on Tilt: Diagonal Lace

7. April 2010 16:00 by Jobo | 7 Comments

 diagonal pose

What a fun Knit! 

I finished the last bit of twisted ribbing on my Diagonal Lace socks (free pattern made available by the designer Wendy Johnson!  Awesome!)

This was my 4th pair of handspun socks... and I was really impressed with myself that the yarn was fine enough to knit the pattern as written, without having to make any serious modifications. 

I used the "small" version of this pattern, and things worked out perfect for my size 8 feet.  Normally I would do the medium or large, so it felt like these just flew off the needles at 64 stitches to the round.  (especially after the last pair which was 72 stitches around)  I used size 2.75 mm DPNs.

The pattern itself was very tidy and well written, as are all of Wendy's patterns that I've tried to date.  The repeating diagonal line of eyelets was very intuitive and straightforward to follow.  This was a great "car" knitting pattern, and I plan to knit another pair soon!

 

Trying to use up as much of this cotton candy sweet yarn as possible, I worked on both socks at the same time, by switching back and forth.  I think these are the tallest socks I've made to date... they seem to swallow my sock blockers!  In the end, I think could have knit another whole lace repeat before starting the twisted rib, but I was afraid to run out.  I ended up with two very small balls of yarn, maybe enough for a pair of newborn socks... very small ones.

diagonal leftover yarn I know that some people like their socks to be identical...  I'm not sure why, but I really like the idea of Fraternal Socks! 

As a teenager (and still on the weekends when I don't have to look "professional") I used to wear mismatched socks.  As long as the color scheme matched, it didn't matter to me if one sock was striped and the other was flowery. 

These socks obviously come from the same ball of yarn, but are not identical.  Yet another reason to Love hand spun yarns ;)

<--- Check out those squishy Slip-Stitch Heels?

 

 

I hope you don't mind the shameless photo montage that follows... I'm really pleased with these, and I couldn't wait to show them off to the world!

diagonal toes modified color

diagonal in between modified color diagonal stockinette diagonal curlique modified color

diagonal lace and leftovers

diagonal on

diagonal pair

I decided this was as good a time as any... to try a new Stretch Bind-off for these socks.  Because they come up so high, I knew it would be important for the cuffs to be comfortable around my calves.  After a quick internet search for suitable techniques, I chose to do Elizabeth Zimmermann's sewn bind-off.

The finished cast off doesn't actually feel all that stretchy, but fits okay.  I think I still prefer the typical bind off for triangle shawls that I usually do (K2, slip 1 stitch back to left needle, and k2tog through back loop) since it looks more polished.  The sewn edge looks a bit sloppy but that's likely due to the inexperience of the seamstress ;)  I'll have to try it again a few times before I master it probably.

 

Happy Knitting :)

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